Yee-King Adaptive - unpublications

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Here you can find some un-published texts.

This essay presents a fusion of Pattees [1] discussion of measurement as evidence of emergence in evolution with Keijzer's [2] discussion of proximal and distal environments. The aim is to present a substantiation of Keijzer's 'armchair worries' by means of a perspective derived from Pattee. Evidence from the evolutionary history of sensory-motor complexes will be used in this respect to show that there must be a balance between the different discernable measurement 'devices' at play in a system (natural or artificial) that is behaving adaptively in order to 'produce' stable, consistent behaviour. I will endeavour to define terms in a separate section before I use them as this will clarify the text.

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One of the problems with 'Good old fashioned AI' is the specificity of function and brittleness of its products. A glorified search algorithm capable of beating grand masters at chess is all very well, but it cannot be adapted easily to do much else. It will fall over if given unexpected input. This specificity is in part caused by an ignorance of the causal spread involved in generating complex behaviours. New approaches to the design of artificial systems show a greater awareness of this causal spread. This increased awareness is in part fuelled by the prevalence and effectiveness of natural systems that show large causal spread. Focusing mainly on genetic encoding and developmental processes, this essay is intended to be an explanation and exploration of the phenomenon of causal spread in natural and artificial systems. From this angle it will address the problem of how features can be elicited from natural systems that will be useful in the design of artificial systems. Natural and artificial examples will be used to show that causal spread must be embraced to produce non-trivial systems that are useful and robust.

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Starting with Perkins [1] concept - using Klondike spaces as a yardstick to measure the quality of a creative system, I will discuss the two phases of the creative process. I call these phases the preparation phase and the spontaneous phase. I believe that preparation is an underrated yet integral part of the creative process. Preparation is often ignored or provided 'for free' in computational models. Artificial creative systems that explore Klondike spaces will be used to illustrate the impressive capabilities of computational models in the spontaneous phase of creativity. The characteristics of humans and other natural systems that contribute to the preparatory phase are discussed. I will then introduce my own project in the context of a human - computer combined system that exploits the strengths of both parties to produce exciting, novel sounds.

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Yee-King Adaptive - unpublications